THE MOOD COLLAGE: Giving meaning to non-verbal messaging


Kendrick Wang

Kendrick Wang

This is another in a series of posts about Mood Collages.

Understanding and being able to verbalize the elements of your own aesthetic helps you communicate your design messaging to others.

The images shown here are from my Costume Design class in the Entertainment Design Dept at Art Center College of Design.

also check out my VIDEO on YouTube http://youtu.be/vVm-6tX0eMo

TELLING THE VISUAL STORY: COLOR, SURFACE, FORM LANGUAGE

 MOOD the designer tries to create a mood, and uses the elements of The Visual Story to act on the viewer to solicit a particular emotional response. Example: euphoria, excitement, dread, fear, longing, lust, love, etc… are emotional responses to visual messaging that can be enhanced by a deliberate use of The Visual Story Elements: color, surface, form language.

Liam MacDonald

Liam MacDonald

COLOR – colors within your mood collage should be compatible and similar in their intensity and clarity. They should be able to coordinate and “go together”.

  • It is best to talk about them in clear COLOR THEORY language.
  • Do not use “trendy” color names in the early stages of concept development as they can lead to confusion.
  • These kinds of names are assigned AFTER the message of the mood collage is set.
  • These color names usually reinforce the visual messaging of the color story.

Example #1: value, intensity, clarity, tones, shades, primaries, Secondaries, complementary, etc…are all clear descriptive words used to describe color properties. Example #2: Pepto-Bismol pink – is actually a magenta based red with a lot of white added to make it a “Tone”. If you had never seen Pepto-Bismol, how would you know what color it is? SURFACE – describes the properties of the materials including: smooth, rough, opaque, transparent, heavy, light, bulky, stretching, stiff, soft, fuzzy, shinny, etc…

  • In apparel this describes the “hand” of the material or how it feels on the skin.
  • Because apparel is driven by the wearer, it is one of the more kinetic design forms.
  • In this case the Surface and the Form Language work together to create movement.

FORM LANGUAGE – describes the shape, silhouette and flow of the design.

  • Fabric draped over a form creates folds that may lead the eye to a center of interest.
  • Shapes and visual flow can appear curvy, angular, geometric, straight lines, tight or open curves, complex or simple.
  • The complexity of the shapes can appear minimalistic or concentrated and active.
  • The weight and drape of the material enhances the perception of the form language.
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About Justine Limpus Parish

Associate Professor - Art Center College of Design apparel design - Product Design Dept. costume design - Entertainment Design Dept Fashion Instructor: Mt San Antonio College Workshop instructor: Disney Consumer Products
This entry was posted in ENTERTAINMENT DESIGN, FASHION & COSTUME ILLUSTRATION, FASHION DESIGN, PRODUCT DESIGN/APPAREL, STUDENT WORK, TEACHING and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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